github

Transpiled JS on Github?

If you’re maintaining a javascript project on Github there’s a good chance you’re using a transpiler. Most developers don’t publish transpiled code to Github because it makes your pull requests look messed up and it’s difficult to keep source and transpiled code in sync. Why would anyone publish transpiled code anyways? For node modules, if transpiled code is available on Github, the module can be installed directly from Github. This can be useful for people who can’t use npmjs for some reasons.
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Github repo license file

Github is without doubt one of the best things ever happened to open source software development. I, like many other FOSS developers, always use Github to host my projects. And like most of them I thought all of my public projects are by default open source. What we must understand here is that when we post our work online, it’s automatically protected by copyright laws unless we specify otherwise. This rule also applies to all Github repositories, both private and public.
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When not to "Fork" on Github

When I first started using Github, just like many others I simply went ahead and forked each and every repository I liked on Github. But this makes no sense at all. Fork because the site says “Fork me on Github” When they say that they are actually asking you to contribute to their project with code, tests, docs or other stuff at Github. Simply forking the repo and leaving it like that is no use to them.
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Create an empty git branch

It’s really easy to create a new empty git branch with no parents (AKA orphan branches). First create an orphan branch with this command. git checkout --orphan newbranch Now you can remove any files in the directory and finally push it to a Github repository. git rm -rf * git push origin newbranch If you create branch in Github it’ll create the branch from master (which is what you’re going to do most of the time).
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